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Home > Fonts > ITC > ITC Johnston

ITC Johnston

ITC Johnston™ by ITC
Individual Styles from $29.00
Complete family of 6 fonts: $189.99
ITC Johnston Font Family was designed by Dave Farey, Richard Dawson, Edward Johnston and published by ITC. ITC Johnston contains 6 styles and family package options. More about this family
Select style to display all glyphs:
ITC Johnston Light Italic
ITC Johnston Light Italic
ITC Johnston Medium Italic
ITC Johnston Bold Italic
ITC Johnston Light
ITC Johnston Medium
ITC Johnston Bold

ITC Johnston Light Italic - Glyph Count:

This is a listing of all glyphs contained in the font, including OpenType variants that may only be accessible via OpenType-aware applications.

Each basic character (“A”) is followed by Unicode variants of the same character (Á, Ä…), then OpenType variants (small caps, alternates, ligatures…). This way you can see all the variations on a single character in one place.

  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Light Italic
  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Medium Italic
  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Bold Italic
  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Light
  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Medium
  • from    $29.00
    ITC Johnston Bold
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Select style to display tech specs:
  • ITC Johnston Light Italic image
  • ITC Johnston Medium Italic image
  • ITC Johnston Bold Italic image
  • ITC Johnston Light image
  • ITC Johnston Medium image
  • ITC Johnston Bold image

Licensing Options

You can use this font in any of the following places. Read the full EULA text for details about each license. If you have a usage in mind that's not covered by these licenses, contact us and we'll see what we can do.

Desktop: for use on a desktop workstation

For the most common uses, both personal and professional, for use in desktop applications with a font menu.

For example:

  • Install the font on your Mac OS X or Windows system
  • Use the font within desktop applications such as Microsoft Word, Mac Pages, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Photoshop, etc.
  • Create and print documents, as well as static images (.jpeg, .tiff, .png)

Desktop licenses are based on the number of users of the fonts. You can change the number of users by clicking the quantity dropdown option on Buying Choices or Cart pages.

Please be sure to review the listing foundry's Desktop license agreement as some restrictions may apply—such as use in logos/trademarks, geographic restrictions (number of locations), and products that will be sold.

Adding users later:

Desktop licenses are cumulative. If you require a Desktop license that covers additional users, simply place a new order for the same Desktop package, for the number of additional users.

ITC Johnston Desktop EULA

Webfont: for your website

Webfonts can be used on a single domain. Agencies responsible for multiple websites, for example web design agencies or hosting providers, may not share a single webfont license across multiple websites.

Every time the webpage using the webfont kit is loaded (i.e, the webfont kit CSS which holds the @font-face rule is called) the counting system counts a single pageview for each webfont within the webfont kit.

For usage in graphic images shown on the website, consider a Desktop license instead as most allow for it.

This font's webfont license is:

Annual

You get a total number of prepaid pageviews that can be used over time. This means that you will pre-pay for a number of pageviews, then you'll have to come back to order more after your site has been viewed that number of times.

For example, if you order 250,000 page views, when your webpages using the webfonts have been viewed 250,000 times, you will need to buy the webfont package again for an additional number of prepaid pageviews.

ITC Johnston WebFont EULA

App: for embedding in mobile applications

Select this license type when you are developing an app for iOS, Android, or Windows Phone, and you will be embedding the font file in your mobile application's code.

ITC Johnston App EULA

Digital Ad/Email: for use in HTML5 ads

You can use this type of license to embed fonts into digital ads, such as ads built using HTML5.

We'll supply a kit containing webfonts that can be used within digital ads, such as banner ads. This kit may be shared with third parties who are working on your behalf to produce the ad creatives, however you are wholly responsible for it.

HTML5 ads use webfonts, so why purchase a Digital Ads license rather than a Webfont license?

There are a few reasons, such as the Digital Ads EULA having terms that enable usage in digital ads and on advertising networks.

Digital advertisements also have different usage patterns compared to websites. Most websites generally have consistent pageviews month-to-month whereas advertising impressions can vary wildly month-to-month. Prices reflect this, making it much less expensive to use a Digital Ad license.

If you know the number of impressions the campaign requires, that amount can be ordered before the campaign begins. For campaigns where number impressions is unknown until the end of the campaign, you can true up at the end of each calendar month.

ITC Johnston Digital Ad/Email EULA

Electronic Doc: for embedding in e-text products

You can use an Electronic Doc license to embed the font in an electronic publication such as an eBook, eMagazine, eNewspaper, or interactive PDF.

An Electronic Doc license is based on the number of publications in which the font is used. Each issue counts as a separate publication. Regional or format variations don't count as separate publications.

Updated versions of publications that are free to previous customers do not need a new license; otherwise, each new version that is released counts as a separate publication.

For font usage in graphic images shown as the ePub cover, consider a Desktop license instead as most allow for it.

ITC Johnston Electronic Doc EULA

About ITC Johnston Font Family


ITC Johnston is the result of the combined talents of Dave Farey and Richard Dawson, based on the work of Edward Johnston. In developing ITC Johnston, says London type designer Dave Farey, he did “lots of research on not only the face but the man.” Edward Johnston was something of an eccentric, “famous for sitting in a deck chair and carrying toast in his pockets.” (The deck chair was his preferred furniture in his own living room; the toast was so that he’d always have sustenance near at hand.) Johnston was also almost single-handedly responsible, early in this century, for the revival in Britain of the Renaissance calligraphic tradition of the chancery italic. His book Writing & Illuminating, & Lettering (with its peculiar extraneous comma in the title) is a classic on its subject, and his influence on his contemporaries was tremendous. He is perhaps best remembered, however, for the alphabet that he designed in 1916 for the London Underground Railway (now London Transport), which was based on his original “block letter” model.

Johnston’s letters were constructed very carefully, based on his study of historical writing techniques at the British Museum. His capital letters took their form from the best classical Roman inscriptions. “He had serious rules for his sans serif style,” says Farey, “particularly the height-to-weight ratio of 1:7 for the construction of line weight, and therefore horizontals and verticals were to be the same thickness. Johnston’s O’s and C’s and G’s and even his S’s were constructions of perfect circles. This was a bit of a problem as far as text sizes were concerned, or in reality sizes smaller than half an inch. It also precluded any other weight but medium ‘ any weight lighter or heavier than his 1:7 relationship.” Johnston was famously slow at any project he undertook, says Farey. “He did eventually, under protest, create a bolder weight, in capitals only ‘ which took twenty years to complete.”

Farey and his colleague Richard Dawson have based ITC Johnston on Edward Johnston’s original block letters, expanding them into a three-weight type family. Johnston himself never called his Underground lettering a typeface, according to Farey. It was an alphabet meant for signage and other display purposes, designed to be legible at a glance rather than readable in passages of text. Farey and Dawson’s adaptation retains the sparkling starkness of Johnston’s letters while combining comfortably into text.

Johnston’s block letter bears an obvious resemblance to Gill Sans, the highly successful type family developed by Monotype in the 1920s. The young Eric Gill had studied under Johnston at the London College of Printing, worked on the Underground project with him, and followed many of the same principles in developing his own sans serif typeface. The Johnston letters gave a characteristic look to London’s transport system after the First World War, but it was Gill Sans that became the emblematic letter form of British graphic design for decades. (Johnston’s sans serif continued in use in the Underground until the early ‘80s, when a revised and modernized version, with a tighter fit and a larger x-height, was designed by the London design firm Banks and Miles.)

Farey and Dawson, working from their studio in London’s Clerkenwell, wanted to create a type family that was neither a museum piece nor a bastardization, and that would “provide an alternative of the same school” to the omnipresent Gill Sans. “These alphabets,” says Farey, referring to the Johnston letters, “have never been developed as contemporary styles.” He and Dawson not only devised three weights of ITC Johnston but gave it a full set of small capitals in each weight ‘ something that neither the original Johnston face nor the Gill faces have ‘ as well as old-style figures and several alternate characters.

Designers: Dave Farey, Richard Dawson, Edward Johnston

Publisher: ITC

Foundry: ITC

Design Owner: ITC

MyFonts debut: Feb 10, 2004

ITC Johnston™ is a trademark of Monotype ITC Inc. and may be registered in certain jurisdictions.